Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Raoul Pantin journalist social chronicler RIP

Journalist author and playwright Raoul Pantin passed away last night. Condolences to his family, friends and colleagues. He was a social chronicler and an institution of memory of Independence, the Black Power Revolution and the 1990 attempted coup. Apart from his journalism I admired his tenacity over the last year against drinking. Share your thoughts here. May he RIP @lolleaves @krisramp #Demokrissy #MediaEducation #CaribbeanHeritage

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

First Chair National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago


The National Museum and Art Gallery was originally established as the Royal Victoria Institute in 1892.  For the first time in the history of its existence, a Board of Management will be established to oversee the operations of the institution. The first Chair of the Board is Dr Kris Rampersad. The Board of the National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago will be responsible for the preservation, research, presentation and interpretation of significant and representative collections housed at the museum.This inaugural board of the National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago will work in accordance with the National Museum and Art Gallery Act of 2000, to facilitate the growth and sustainable development of the National Museum through policy development in areas of: Human Resources, Collection Management and Museum Education and Programming. As the inaugural Board after a hiatus of over a decade, there is no doubt that any member of this Board, must be willing to give of their time and intellectual resources in order to safely enhance the work of the Museum as a tool for social change and custodian of our tangible and intangible heritage.

Receiving instruments of appointment as Chair of the Board of National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago, Dr Kris Rampersad from Minister of National Diversity and Social Integration, the Honourable Rodger Samuels 

Monday, November 24, 2014

Amazon

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t #TED : http://on.ted.com/j0cTY

UNESCO Caribbean experts meet to plan actions to secure World Heritage


Trinidad and Tobago joins Caribbean in preparing action plan for managing World Heritage
Published on November 24, 2014 Email To Friend    Print Version

PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad -- Trinidad and Tobago’s Dr Kris Rampersad will participate in the preparation of a five-year action plan on World Heritage for the Caribbean this month.

Hosted by Cuba, the meeting will bring together the focal points for World Heritage in 20 member and associate states of the Caribbean, representatives of the advisory bodies to the UNESCO Convention, universities, and specialists of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre and the UNESCO offices in Havana, Kingston and Port-au-Prince. It is being supported by the Neterlands-Funds-in-Trust.

kris_rampersad_unesco.jpg
Heritage Educator, Dr Kris Rampersad, Trinidad and Tobago Representative on UNESCO Executive Board
Rampersad will lead discussions on strengthening the role of local communities in the identification, conservation and management of heritage, drawing from experiences in working across the Caribbean in preparing multisectoral stakeholders in government, academia, media, civil society, local government, tourism actors among others.

A heritage educator, researcher and advocate, she was also part of the team preparing the regional action plan for Latin America and the Caribbean earlier this year. She is also the Trinidad and Tobago representative on the UNESCO Executive Board, Chair of the Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO, and member the executive advisory bodies of the International Culture University and the International Institute on Gastronomy, Culture the Arts and Tourism.

With the aim of devising a Caribbean Action Plan for World Heritage 2014-2019, the meeting will review Caribbean actions on heritage and develop strategies to build capacities of persons engaged in conserving, managing and monitoring heritage elements and address challenges of small island developing states, risk management for climate change, harnessing community knowledge, building cross sectoral partnerships and networks between and among actors and sectors as with education, science, communications, tourism, and others.

It intends to enhance coordination of efforts by the World Heritage community, strengthen the inter-university network, and promote Caribbean-Pacific coordination within the framework of the International Year of Small Island Developing States.

According to the organisers, “In a period of rapid social and environmental changes, the value of heritage in human development, as a repository of knowledge, an engine for economic growth and a symbolic force that brings stability and direction to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world, becomes crucial.”

Comments:

YAEESH ABDUL-WAHID:

I OF AM A MEMBER OF EAST PORT OF SPAIN HERITAGE ASSOCIATION.ALSO OUR GROUP LAVENTILLE AND ENVIRONS ACTION DEVELOPMENT ATTENDED A FIVE SATURDAY WEEK END HERITAGE WORKSHOP AT THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO BY THE BELMONT FREETOWN FOUNDATION 2014 AND OTHER CAPACITY BUILDING INCLUSION INTERVENTION RELATED EVENTS FROM APRIL 2013 TO PRESENT. WE KNOW THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS INITIATIVE IS FOR THE PURPOSE OF ESTABLISHING A SUSTAINABLE MANDATE FOR GLOBAL HERITAGE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT.

Back...
http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/headline-Trinidad-and-Tobago-joins-Caribbean-in-preparing-action-plan-for-managing-World-Heritage-23765.html

Saturday, November 22, 2014

UNESCO launches new international indentured indian immigrant labour route programme


Trinidad and Tobago key to understanding migrations, UNESCO told
As UNESCO launches new international indentured indian immigrant labour route programmen

PARIS, France -- Trinidad and Tobago’s geographical location makes it pivotal to deepening understanding pre- and post-colonial migration routes, Dr Kris Rampersad told the United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organisation (UNESCO) Executive Board.

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Heritage Educator, Dr Kris Rampersad, Trinidad and Tobago Representative on UNESCO Executive Board
However, much of this is yet unassessed, understudied, undervalued, undocumented and unaccounted for in the contexts of global migration and cultural evolution. They are also under tremendous development pressures and face other challenges common to small island developing states, she said.

Trinidad and Tobago was among countries supporting the introduction of the new programme of the UNESCO at the 195th session of the board in Paris to recognise the international impact of migration of post emancipation indentured Indian immigrant labour.

In supporting the Mauritius initiative entitled The International Indentured Labour Route Project, geared to enhance knowledge around its landing point of Indian immigration, the Aapravasi Ghat, Rampersad, the Trinidad and Tobago Representative on the 58-member board, pointed out that the Caribbean was a critical dimension of labour migration to post slavery societies, noting that more than one million Indian and other Asians crossed the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Americas in the immediate post-emancipation period. 

She said her research shows the islands may hold the key to broadening and deepening understanding pre-Columbian migrations in the Americas as it has been in the colonial and post slavery migrations from Europe, Africa and Asian in its location off the tip of South America and as the most southerly of Caribbean islands.

Rampersad, a heritage educator, researcher and journalist, who has been researching and advocating for greater national and international efforts at safeguarding what she calls “the other Magnificent Seven of South Trinidad and the Global South,” said the heritage assets of small island states like Trinidad and Tobago, remain vulnerable to other pressing development agendas. 

She has written in her blog to the Trinidad and Tobago President Anthony Carmona and Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar asking them to prioritise their safeguarding within the national development agenda and readers are circulating online petition in support. 

Piloted by Mauritius, which also agreed to provide extra-budgetary funds to support its implementation, the decision to introduce The International Indentured Labour Route Project was universally supported and adopted by the UNESCO Board, along with other programmes to safeguard vulnerable heritage assets in other countries, following the negotiation of the text which came before the Programmes and External Affairs Commission. The Commission, one of two decision-making Commissions of the Board, was co-chaired by Rampersad.

Rampersad suggested to UNESCO that as the project unfolds, the Board also explore not only the synergies with the Slave Route project but also the potential of private-public sector and NGO partnerships within both and how they may broadening and deepening the proposed refocus on oceans and small island developing states so as “to accommodate equity and balance and the cultural diversity and heritage dimensions in the United Nations post-2015 sustainable development agenda.”

The Mauritius initiative drew from a decision of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee that considered “the importance of an International Indentured Labour Route Project to complement the Slave Route Project and the General History of Africa which will be implemented in the context of the International Decade of People of African descent.” 

Rampersad is the UNESCO national focal point on World Heritage and its trained facilitator for the English-speaking Caribbean on the Convention for the Protection and Safeguarding the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity (2003). She has also been part of Commonwealth and UNESCO initiatives to recognise culture-centred development through these and other conventions that drive the cultural and creative industries sectors as the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005).

Rampersad noted that the new programme, which has already been highly commended by Africa, Asia/Pacific, European and Latin American and Caribbean delegates also presents possibilities towards heightening the dimensions of international cooperation promoted in the UNESCO conventions against trafficking in cultural property (1970), World Heritage (1972), intangible cultural expressions (2003), diversity of cultural expressions (2005) and underwater cultural heritage (2006).

In an interview on the initiative, she said: “Ebola is today waving its passport of global citizenship and has more clearly brought home to us the realities of the borderless world in which we really exist. As children of both slave and silk routes, though far removed from some of our societies of origin – and I say this acknowledging the also marginalised indigenous communities of our region, we in the Caribbean have naturally existed in trans-boundary spaces with intertwined heritage that span all the continents of the world. While in some of our societies these remain vibrant and effervescent and spawning new cultures through fusions, in others they are significantly in danger of disappearing from various pressures, still unmapped, understudied, underassessed and undervalued in the contexts of our global village.

“In turn, we have also spawned other diasporas, offspring of our complex Caribbean societies, in other parts of the Americas, in Europe, in Africa and in Asia itself, that are not just parallel to but intimately intertwined with the storyline of our post slavery evolution.”

In acknowledging synergies between the Slave Route Project and the new project, the Board “recognised the need to develop professional capacity in fields as history, anthropology, archaeology and heritage towards creating an international database on indentured labour… about such a major historical event and build greater understanding and cooperation among peoples.”

The UNESCO Executive Board also lent support for a series of activities to celebrate UNESCO’s 70th anniversary; initiatives related to prioritising education and culture in the UN post 2015 development agenda, introduced new international prizes and revived some which were suspended owing to financial and other challenges. 

The Board is chaired by Mohamed Sameh Amr of Egypt and the UNESCO secretariat is headed by Director General, Irina Bokova.

 http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/topstory-Trinidad-and-Tobago-key-to-understanding-migrations,-UNESCO-told-23715.html

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Trinidad and Tobago at UNESCO 195 in news

http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/topstory-Trinidad-and-Tobago-vice-chairs-UNESCO's-programmes_external-relations-commission-23366.html

Trinidad and Tobago vice-chairs UNESCO's programmes/external relations commission
Published on October 25, 2014

PARIS, France -- Dr Kris Rampersad, Trinidad and Tobago’s representative to the UNESCO executive board, was elected unopposed as the vice-chair of UNESCO’s programmes and external services commission (PX) to the board for the second consecutive time. The PX Commission is one of two commissions of the UNESCO executive board and is charged with examining and directing UNESCO’s programmes. It is chaired by Porfirio Thierry Muñoz Ledo of Mexico.

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Dr Kris Rampersad
Now chaired by Egypt’s Mohamed Sameh Amr, the 58-member executive board, currently in its 195th session in Paris, is one of three governing organs of UNESCO with the General Assembly and Secretariat. It is responsible for appraising and informing UNESCO’s work programme and budgets. This is the first year of Trinidad and Tobago’s term on the board since it was elected by the 2013 General Assembly, when it polled the highest number of votes among candidates for the Latin American and Caribbean (GRULAC) region.

Rampersad, a cultural heritage researcher, educator and multimedia journalist, is a former independent member of the consultative body of UNESCO Inter-Governmental Committee on Intangible Cultural Heritage, and chair of the Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO.

She also serves on the advisory boards of the International Culture University and the International Institute of Gastronomy, Culture, Arts and Tourism, and has worked across the UN, Commonwealth and OAS regions working with multisectoral partners in civil society, government, private sector, academia and intergovernmental agencies to devise multidimensional approaches to addressing challenges of change sustainable development.

She has devised and conducted creative interactive courses, seminars and education programmes that encourage critical interrogation of development agendas to stimulate people-centred, gender and culture-sensitive paths to progress.

These include evaluations and assessments of north-south relations and particularly the small island developing states of the Caribbean in international policy arena, particularly in relation to gender, governance, culture and education at such forums as Commonwealth and OAS Summits; World Summit of Information Society; World Summit on Arts and Culture, Commonwealth Diversity Conferences, International Conferences on Cultural Policy Research, Brussels Briefings on Agriculture of the ACP-EU, among others.

Her successful pilot strategy for such round-table engagements to explore solutions towards food security was adopted as the model for the ACP-EU International Seminar on Media and Agriculture in Brussels.

Rampersad is the author of the three acclaimed seminal groundbreaking works: Finding a Place on the Indo-Trinidadian literary history of Trinidad and Tobago; Through the Political Glass Ceiling – Race to Prime Ministership by Trinidad and Tobago’s First Female and LiTTscapes – Landscapes of Fiction from Trinidad and Tobago which features its literary heritage through more than 100 works by more than 60 writers since 1595.
http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/topstory-Trinidad-and-Tobago-vice-chairs-UNESCO's-programmes_external-relations-commission-23366.html

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Towards consensus in protecting our global heritage and legacy

Heritage can drive consensus and collaboration for sustainable development 

‘T&T world heritage status at risk

...fiddling while Rome burns, political imbroglio leaves custodians mum
Published: 
Sunday, October 19, 2014
Dr Kris Rampersad
The Banwari archeological site is not yet a world heritage site and its potential to become one is in jeopardy with “unchecked and undermanaged development initiatives.” Speaking from Paris where she is attending the meeting of the biannual Unesco executive board, heritage educator Dr Kris Rampersad said misinformation was being bandied about concerning T&T’s world heritage status. “No one, on any side, has taken the time to check the information being presented,” she said.
Rampersad, who is a Unesco-Commonwealth trained heritage facilitator and the Unesco focal point for World Heritage in T&T, told the Sunday Guardian it was unfortunate the issue is being politicised and has become something of the rope in the tug of war between the State and the Highway Re-route Movement.
“That prevents the consensus building and nation building that occurs around a country’s preparation for world heritage status. I remain flabbergasted that with the significance and potential of heritage as a core growth sector as the alternative to petroleum and our best bet for diversification, that these most valuable timeless assets and heritage, in general, remain so low on the national action agenda,” she said.
Rampersad has been blogging about what she calls “The Other Magnificent Seven of south Trinidad/South America and the Global South” and has written to President Anthony Carmona and Prime Minister Kamla Persad Bissessar (goo.gl/Um7YkU) asking them to take the lead in securing these assets which hold enormous value for T&T’s economic diversification, its knowledge economy, and its place in our global civilisation (www.kris-rampersad-blogspot.com).
In her latest Demokrissy blog post, The Politics of Disempowerment, Rampersad noted that while she has received encouragement and agreement by various sectors, some key custodians and line agencies of heritage have gone mum because the elements in focus are in the districts earmarked for the controversial highway extension, also the home districts of the President and the Prime Minister, and they do not want to get embroiled in what may be interpreted as the hype around the highway. 
“Trustee organisations and officials just don’t want to get embroiled, so it’s a case of fiddling while Rome burns.”  That has also been the fate of a change.org petition (goo.gl/tNAwm6) in circulation on the issue, said the outspoken Rampersad, who is also an author and independent multimedia journalist.
“The fact is that neither the site, nor any of the several unique invaluable heritage elements of south Trinidad are secured in world heritage terms so as to facilitate them acquiring world heritage status as they are. “Banwari is not a world heritage site as is being claimed. It is on a tentative list which is a list that includes items states submit that they intend to prepare for such status.
“The concept being promoted of the site—the half-acre plot of where the skeleton remains were found—is itself erroneous, as a heritage site involves broader association of factors. We have not yet done the investigations nor groundwork that will consolidate the scope and value, though my preliminary independent research suggests that it is just the tip of the iceberg of more fundamental discoveries that could substantially revise how this region’s evolution and migration among others have been viewed.”
Rampersad said heritage was not a footnote in national development. “It is likely to be the lifeline to which we would have to turn in the next two decades when the oil dries up.



http://www.trinidadexpress.com/commentaries/The-price-for-progress-279732112.html?m=y&smobile=y

Shining light of cultural heritage knowledge over ignorance from UNESCO


Lord Shiva Temple in Cambodia gets Happy Divali present from UNESCO #195EX

Happy Divali from #UNESCO #Paris Where #UNESCO #195EX unanimously support UNESCO efforts in safeguarding cultural heritage of Cote d Ivoire Iraq, and other zones of conflict or heritage in danger.
Today, Divali Day, the Programme and External Affairs Commission of the UNESCO Executive Board, co-chaired by Mexico and Trinidad and Tobago also unanimously passed a resolution for establishment of an International Coordinating Committee for the Preah Vihar Temple which was subject to prolonged dispute between Cambodia and Thailand but which after a long process came to an agreement that found consensus between the two parties and was unanimously supported by the PX Commission.
Congrats to colleagues who worked on the difficult drafting and negotiation process of this and the State parties Cambodia and Thailand for this exemplary collaboration.
Temple of Preah Vijeah of Cambodia via
UNESCO World Heritage Committee

Let's also take pride in and protect ours.


Get Involved http://goo.gl/tNAwm6
Get Informed goo.gl/Um7YkU     
Get Enlightened  http://goo.gl/zUbDJy
Know more http://goo.gl/rU0DTn

Saturday, October 18, 2014

The Politics of Disempowerment

The Banwari archeological site is not a World Heritage site and its potential to become such is in jeopardy with unchecked and undermanaged development initiatives.
It is unfortunate that the issue is being politicised and has become something of the rope in the tug of war impasse between the State and the highway reroute movement that prevents the consensus-building and nation-building that occurs around a country’s preparation for World Heritage status. 
I remain flabbergasted that its significance and potential as a core growth sector, as the alternative to petroleum and our best bet for diversification, that these most valuable timeless assets and heritage, in general, remain so low on the national action agenda.
While in all cases I have received encouragement by all parties to whom this has been addressed – heritage, tourism, development planners, local authorities etc that this is a direction Trinidad and Tobago wants to pursue, key custodians and line agencies have gone mum because the elements in focus are in the districts earmarked for the controversial highway extension, also the home districts of the President and the Prime Minister, and they do not want to get embroiled in what may be interpreted as the hype around the highway.  That has also been the fate of a change.org petition (goo.gl/tNAwm6) in circulation on the issue.
The fact is that neither the site, nor any of the several unique invaluable heritage elements of South Trinidad, are secured in world heritage terms so as to facilitate them acquiring world heritage status as they are. Banwari is not a World Heritage site as is being claimed. It is on a tentative list along with the Pitch Lake and Tobago Main Ridge. This is a list that includes items States submit that they intend to prepare for such status. Trinidad and Tobago had submitted these three elements to the list in 2006. It is only in 2011, when accompanying the President of the National Commission of UNESCO as part of the Trinidad and Tobago Delegation to the UNESCO General Assembly in Paris, when I raised the matter with the world heritage officials that the three items submitted were admitted to the tentative list near the end of 2011. Score one for Trinidad and Tobago but being on this list does not automatically mean these elements have world heritage status, but actions will be taken to prepare them to become so.
Through a range of defined actions UNESCO has in fact over the years considerably lifted the bar to what qualifies for its lists which means what actions a State takes to secure its assets. But there are several in the region, less resourced than Trinidad and Tobago, who have made the grade, so there is no reason that we cannot, once we can harness the collective will.
The concept being promoted of the site – the half acre plot of where the skeleton remains were found – is itself erroneous, as a heritage site involves broader association of factors. We have not yet done the investigations, nor groundwork, that will consolidate the scope and value, though my preliminary independent research suggests that it is just the tip of the iceberg of more fundamental discoveries that could substantially revise how this region’s evolution and migration among others have been viewed. It requires prioritising on the agenda and provision of resources to move forward and can promote a unique partnership between the energy sector and heritage that provides Trinidad and Tobago with an enviable platform as a model of sustainable development.
I questioned various agencies promoting post-budget debate on why heritage was not among the topics and they admitted it was being overlooked but did nothing to alter their plans. So it’s not just the way government views our society. It is also the way our society views itself. Heritage is not a footnote in national development and if citizens are to set the agenda we need a concerted voice to do so as heritage is likely to be the lifeline to which we would have to turn in the next two decades when the oil dries up.
It is unfortunate that in what has become now a clash of personalities over extension of the south highway, the more substantive issues involving securing these assets have become secondary.
The heritage sector, a core driver of what is being called the knowledge economy, is the fastest growing global sector and it is potentially our best option for economic diversification.
Given trends of challenges to the finite resources of the energy sector from the clean and green energy lobby and the fact that petroleum and natural gas assets are finite and limited – the forecast is less than 20 years before those energy assets dry up - we should be looking to explore the full advantage of what the heritage sector has to offer. In my estimation backed by preliminary research we are sitting on a gold mine, which we cannot recapture if lost by unplanned and unchecked and unmanaged development. That is not to say that there can be no development. very many countries are adopting innovative ways in which both can be done. Trinidad and Tobago is in an ideal position to lead in this respect: but we need to keep open minds to new options.
This district’s heritage assets is of considerable value not just to the Trinidad and Tobago and the island cultures of the Caribbean, but also in establishing missing links in active research on precolonial and prehistoric period which is the focus of my research. 
None of the officials involved on either side of the fence of the current impasse has attempted to find out what may be so required to achieve World Heritage status and instead there has been a flurry of misinformation flying around. While there has been invariably, 100 percent good will and nods – from the top down - that this is the direction Trinidad and Tobago should go, it remains very low among national priorities, in budget allocations, and the highway hype has stomped any progress in discussions given that the districts where they exist are also the region earmarked for the highway’s path. Trustee organisations and officials just don’t want to get embroiled so it’s a case of fiddling while Rome burns. 
The required actions and investigations of the extent and range of scope have not yet been done with Banwari, nor other potential elements in these districts, and this should be made a priority before development actions that may cost us to lose it all.
There are also other inherent weaknesses in our heritage infrastructure and deficiencies in laws and other broad areas that also need to be addressed, as they are at local management levels. It is not about pointing fingers because these weaknesses existed across regimes but it is incumbent on those in power at the moment to take the necessary actions and it is also imperative that those who are placed as custodians, the line agencies and individuals are informed and aware and active in those roles.
Even without the threats posed by setting down a highway without investigations of the full significance of the district, what is being called the site faced significant threats.
We visited the site with archaeologist Peter Harris and met local officials following a UNESCO workshop last year and pointed out that what might have been construction of well-meaning toilet facilities on the site was potentially compromising its preparation for world heritage status and we were promised that this would be reviewed. That was only one dimension. The local authorities was all ears but became overwhelmed, it seems, when asked to pull the line stakeholders together so they could be informed. That’s why we need to empower local officials, as other local stakeholders, alongside those at policy and decision making and budgeting levels so they take charge and understand how core they are to the process to coordinate and to safeguard and to become active not passive stakeholders; and not driven from the top, or the capital. but by themselves.   
Some of the actions, including those associated with the highway, are not because of ill intent, rather because of lack of understanding and knowledge and awareness of how heritage can be the bridge that can move us beyond the hype.  The four UNESCO Conventions to which Trinidad and Tobago is signatory all promote empowering communities on the one hand and authorities on the other. This requires that interests in industry, civil society, academic, local authorities and others come together, contending and otherwise, so they can take not ad hoc but informed actions and appreciate their respective roles in the process and build consensus.
There are also many options that have not yet been explored in the current furore that can find favour with the majority of the parties involved; that can provide the districts in question with speedy transport route as well as meet conservation and heritage objectives. We just have not opened our eyes to them yet. We are an innovative people. This is a time when we need to apply this spirit of innovation.   
Our systems and institutions derived from a pre-evolved WestMinster confrontational model promote contentions, competition and insecurities between and among various ministries, agencies, institutions and individuals encouraged by historically established State mechanisms that promote dependency and handouts so agents that should be working together to become self sufficient see themselves as competitors for State patronage. We are yet to develop a culture of consensus building that can move us to solid grounds that would promote meaningful governance. It is the challenge of previous regimes; as it is of this current one and it will continue to be so unless we concertedly decide to change the game.
That there is already shared consensus around heritage could be the game-changer where the relationship between the State, national and local governance and civil society, industry and others find a common platform for carving way forward for sustainable development.
Our real challenge starts at home - demonstrating by specific actions that we are serious about our heritage. It is from that the world, UNESCO, whoever, will find value. That means fighting apathy and low priority we have given to this for a long time.
We have for so far fought that we have been written out of history. Here's the opportunity to write ourselves back into it, in a significant way. The options we choose should be to do so, otherwise, we would have only ourselves to blame for blotting ourselves out to perpetuity.   

To sign the letter to the President and Prime Minister go to goo.gl/tNAwm6)

Related links:
Open Letter to President Anthony Carmona and Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar

Impacting the Suicide Pact: Government and Activist in suicide pact, http://goo.gl/zUbDJy,

Rio Claro Through the Kristal bowl SIDS 2014 Rural Regeneration and Sustainable Development, http://goo.gl/GH5tYR,

Caricom must use UNESCO agreement to leverage Caribbean Cultural Heritage: http://goo.gl/yXwr7b

Vandalised: centuries-old heritage tomb spanning global generations, http://goo.gl/B3BYSR,